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Ambassador Carol  Moseley Braun Image

Ambassador Carol Moseley Braun

Founder & President of Good Food Organics; Counsel for Tetzlaff Law; Ambassador to New Zealand and Samoa (1998-2001); United States Senator (1998-1992); Assistant Majority Leader, Illinois General Assembly (1978-1988)

Travels From:
Illinois
Fee Range:
$15,000 - $25,000

Bio

Ambassador Moseley Braun is an inspiring and respected African American leader who has served at all levels of local, state, national and international government. She is the Founder & President of Good Food Organics and Counsel for Tetzlaff Law, she served as Ambassador to New Zealand and Samoa (1998-2001); United States Senator - the first and still only African American woman to be elected to the United States Senate (1998 – 1992); First woman on the United States Senate Finance Committee, Illinois County Executive (1987 -1988), Assistant Majority Leader, Illinois General Assembly (1978 – 1988); Assistant United States Attorney (1983-1988).

Speech Topics

Why is there a pervasive belief that our individual contributions will not count? This presentation offers riveting accounts of tipping points when one person steps up and changed the future for others. Consider the quote attributed to John Wesley, “Do all the good you can. By all the means you can. In all the ways you can. In all the places you can. At all the times you can. To all the people you can. As long as ever you can.”


Based on the Maori traditional view of time, the Ambassador shares how civic engagement defines community.


The Ambassador shares how growing up on the Southside of Chicago instilled values that gave rise to adventures in local, state, national and international government.


Observations with humor on the history, foibles and challenges of the US political system.


From her unique perspective the Ambassador offers an approach to capitalism that places precedence on meeting the needs of the whole community.


The institution of slavery has had a profound and lasting effect on American history. James Baldwin is quoted as saying, “Racism may be American’s original sin.” The 1858 Lincoln and Douglas presidential debates focused on slavery and this was the first time candidates took their arguments directly to the people and the volatility of the slavery issue gave the debates special importance. As a former presidential candidate, the Ambassador has an exceptional perceptive of this historic event and how it shaped American politics.


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