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The Honorable Jeff Sessions

84th Attorney General of The United States (2017 - 2018); United States Senator of Alabama (1996 - 2016)

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Jeff Sessions was born in Selma, Alabama in 1946, and grew up the son of a country store owner. Growing up in the country, Sessions was instilled with certain core values – honesty, hard work, belief in God and parental respect – that define him today. Mr. Sessions served in the United States Army Reserve from 1973 to 1986, ultimately attaining the rank of Captain. He still considers that period to be one of the most rewarding chapters of his life.

Mr. Sessions’ interest in the law led to a distinguished legal career, first as a practicing attorney in Russellville, Alabama, and then in Mobile. Following a two-year stint as Assistant United States Attorney for the Southern District of Alabama (1975-1977), Sessions was nominated by President Reagan in 1981 and confirmed by the Senate to serve as the United States Attorney for the Southern District of Alabama, a position he held for 12 years. Sessions was elected Alabama Attorney General in 1995, serving as the State’s chief legal officer until 1996, when he entered the United States Senate. Mr. Sessions served as a United States Senator for Alabama from 1996 to 2016.

President Donald J. Trump announced his intention to nominate Mr. Sessions on November 18, 2016, and he was sworn in as the 84th Attorney General of the United States by Michael R. Pence on February 9, 2017.

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Mr. Sessions was born in Selma, Alabama as the son of a country store owner. After attending school in nearby Camden, Sessions attended Huntington College, a small liberal arts college, in Montgomery graduating with a Bachelor of Arts degree in History in 1969. He taught in public schools one year before receiving a Juris Doctor degree in 1973 from the University of Alabama. In 1973, he received his U.S. Army Commission and served in the U.S. Army Reserve for over 10 years, ultimately attaining the rank of Captain.

Mr. Sessions served for over two years as an Assistant U.S. attorney (1975 – 1077) before being nominated by President Reagan in 1981. Confirmed by the Senate to serve as U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Alabama, he held the position for 12 years (1981 – 1993). Sessions was later elected as Alabama Attorney General in 1995, serving as the State’s chief legal officer until 1996 when he was elected to the United States Senate (1997 – 2017). In the Senate, he was an active member of the Senate’s Judiciary and Armed Services Committees for 20 years. During this time, he served as ranking Republican on both the Judiciary and the Budget Committees.

Senator Sessions vigorously advocated for a restrained and objective Judiciary that follows the judicial oath to serve the Constitution and laws of our country. He fought for a frugal and balanced budget, a vigorous foreign policy and a strong military. Sessions strongly supported the War on Terrorism but acknowledges the need for realism and limits in our policies. Furthermore, he supports lawful immigration that serves the national interest and that the nation must stand firmly against unfair trade practices.

President Donald J. Trump announced his invitation to nominate Mr. Sessions on November 18, 2016 and he was sworn in as the 84th Attorney General of the United States by Michael R. Pence on February 9, 2017. He served until November 7, 2018.

How well has our projection of power to remote areas of the globe worked? Has it helped the local people and the United States or harmed both? Have we balanced good intentions against the granite of realism? Jeff Sessions’ 20 years on the Senate Armed Services Committee have given him a unique perspective on our magnificent military and taught him to assume personal responsibility for flawed directives. Over those 20 years Jeff Sessions has learned that the first principle is to do no harm, but good intentions are not enough. Compassionate wisdom is required.


As an active legal practitioner for many years and a government attorney, Jeff Sessions’ appreciation for the United States’ magnificent legal system has only grown. But its foundation is threatened in many ways. A decline in the reality of objective truth and even the reality of objectivity is a great danger. Judges deciding policy questions and Courts that feel they get final review over the decision of the executive and legislative branches are having huge impacts on out legal system. In this speech, Sessions discusses why this is important and why judges must honor their oaths to serve under the constitution and laws of the country.


What was it that moved voters to support Donald Trump while many establishment voices opposed?  The Issues did play an important role but what were those Issues and why did the people care? Are these Issues still important and what role will they play next election?


The United States has led the world for decades towards a free trade agenda.  That agenda has generally benefited both the U.S. and the world. But now we face tough technologically advanced countries with cheap labor who profess free trade principles but do not follow them. They are resolute mercantilists seeking to add to their employment rolls and market share while using state power and illegality to defeat our largely defenseless companies. The U.S. must insist on fairness and integrity in our trading partners, especially China.  The good news is that U.S. has far more market power to prevail on these just issues than they. Consistent and firm insistence on fair trade will prevail.


The United States admits 1.1 million immigrants lawfully every year-more than any other country in the world. The U.S. policy should focus on ending the illegality and admitting law abiding persons who are likely to flourish here. The Canadian model would be a good start.


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